ICE is free July 7-11

IceCover

I am humbled and amazed by how well my first novella has been received. With 70+ reviews between Amazon and Goodreads, it has been a great joy to know that most readers have enjoyed ICE. Is it perfect? No, but the vast majority of readers have said that they enjoyed the small-town feel, the suspense, and the sense of community.

ICE tells the story of one fateful November morning when the the fictional town of Minterville, Georgia, is brutalized by vicious thugs. Twenty women are kidnapped and set in a death trap that can quite literally be described as cold. Time is ticking away as the rest of the town scrambles to come up with a viable rescue plan.

Here are what some reviewers have said about ICE:

“This book is a crazy (in a good way) mixture of supernatural, thriller, and mystery.” Emily Woodmansee, who gave it 4 stars.

“The twist this story takes left me caring more about ICE and it’s characters than any book I read recently.” Barbara Chioffi, who gave it 5 stars.

“This was an enjoyable read and the story was good…This being a great beginning to a writing career, there are some things that I personally feel could have made this story far better.” Tom Fallwell, who rated it 3.5 stars.

“A fast paced entertainment that sets the scene frot an uncertain future.” Mmcqu2005, who rated it 5 stars.

“Very interesting storyline…unique writing style.” Amanshay, who rated it 4 stars.

“The plot was excellent, the descriptive a done in a way that made the author’s research excellent.” Amazon Pygmy Reviews, who rated it 5 stars.

“This had an excellent plot that kept m reading to the end but it could have been so much more…[the author] is talented and I would read more…just need more development.” Loki, who rated it three stars.

ICE is also the precursor to my upcoming C.I.N. Dystopian trilogy. If you are interested, check it out free until the 11th. Thank you for your support of indie authors.

https://www.amazon.com/Ice-Jessica-Wren-ebook/product-reviews/B00O1CCAU6/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_hist_2?ie=UTF8&sortBy=recent&formatType=current_format&filterByStar=two_star&pageNumber=1

Advertisements

Celebrating 50 Reviews of “Ice”

Ice_cover2

A little less than a year after publication, today “Ice” got its 50th review on Amazon (there are more reviews if you count the ones on Goodreads). I am beyond humbled that my debut novel is been, for the most part, well-received. Most reviewers agree that although “Ice’ has its faults (which mostly boil down to first-time-writer mistakes), that the story overall is good.

Because a lot of reviewers told me that some of the ideas presented in “Ice” need further development, I am now planning a quick rewrite to make some adjustments-and to make it match the planned Minterville series. (I will never again attempt a first-person thriller novel, especially with multiple narrators.) The Minterville series will eventually contain eight novels (with Ice being Book 5), with the last two being crossover novels with my Cadiz Beach series.

  1. Blizzard-recounts James Minter’s service in World War II, his heroic action that earned him The Minter as a reward, and his return home to found the horse-breeding hacienda that eventually became the city of Minterville
  2. Snow-Thirty-five years after the founding Minterville, the town is inhabited exclusively by the “Mints”-until 1980, when a stranger arrives in town, down on his luck and looking for a job. Although Jim is mistrustful, the stranger proves to be hard-working and resourceful-and has fallen in love with Jim’s homely daughter. Jim, whose stepson died of a heroin overdose, has his suspicions that the stranger may be involved with criminal activity, but he cannot prove it and is terrified for his only daughter’s safety.
  3. Frost-exactly ten years later in 1990, another stranger, a beautiful but somewhat disagreeable woman, appears out of nowhere. Jim, out of pity, offers her a job and she proves to be an extremely talented gardener. But when she starts receiving visits from shady characters, Jim is forced to choose between protecting the young woman who has married into the Minterville clan and sending her away (to a possible demise) to protect his believed community.
  4. Chills-The year is 1993, and and series of disasters have befallen Minterville. Jim, now close to death, warns the townspeople that the disasters are indicative of an eventual disaster that will threaten the survival of the community. Tom seconds Jim’s prediction and is elected mayor. And when a baby girl goes missing, the Mints are on edge, wondering who is stalking their town.
  5. Ice-By 2011, life in Minterville for the most part returns to normal. However, in November, The Minter stops functioning, a sure-fire signal that evil is present in the town. When a terrible crime occurs, the Mints are devastated to find out that one of their own may be responsible for the crime.
  6. Shivers-Five years after the so-called Minterville massacre, rumors of a second attack are circulating. Feeling responsible for the damage inflicted on the town, one person sets out to rid the world of the threat that had been plaguing Minterville for years.
  7. Freeze- Cadiz beach-based writer Jenelle Greene travels to Minterville to write a book about the 2011 killings, with her son Isaac and her second cousin Brielle in tow. She soon forms a bond with the only living survivor of the Minterville Massacre.It is no secret that Jenelle is the granddaughter of the infamous late Irish mobster Connor Cahill, but comparing notes, Jenelle and her new friends wonder if there may be a connection between Connor and the “Ice Queen” who tortured Minterville for so long.Things get more complicated when Isaac falls in love with a Mint and decides to stay ,and Brielle, a Consummate, soon picks up that there is something supernatural about the town. Fearful that The Minter will be exposed (and paranoid about another attack), the Mints do all they can to expel the now-unwanted outsiders.
  8. Winter- The younger generation of Mints are now marrying outside the community, and Jim’s granddaughter, fearing that The Minter will eventually die out, tells her own grandson what he needs to do to make sure it goes on. Meanwhile, a stranger arrives in town, claiming he has been hearing the word “Minterville” in his head his whole life and finally located the only city by that name in America. Digging into his past, the Mints discover that the youth was born in prison to one of the women responsible for the Minterville Massacre. But who is his Mint father? More importantly, why would he betray his town for lust, and did he further endanger Minterville? Kendra swallows her pride and calls Brielle, who may have answers that will send shock waves-but eventually bring peace-to the two towns.

In the next few days I will write a post describing the Cadiz Beach series. I got a little side-tracked, but I want to thank every single person who took the time to read and review Ice. I am learned something from every single review-good and bad-that I can apply towards futures projects and hopefully give readers an even better reading experience.

Help Me Live a Dream!

Who wants to help me fulfill my dream of having “Ice” as bestseller for a day? It’s free until the 9th and as of this post, it’s #2 in two sub-genres and #653 overall. http://www.amazon.com/Ice-Jessica-Wren-ebook/dp/B00O1CCAU6/ref=sr_1_6?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1436196425&sr=1-6&keywords=ice&pebp=1436196435519&perid=1PY5Q6MDPD37976ABPA2.

If I can break the top 500 by the end of today, I’ll be so happy.

If you already have “Ice” or crime thrillers aren’t your thing, you can still help by reblogging and entering my rafflecopter https://www.rafflecopter.com/rafl/display/2a6ee6ce1/?. Any and all help is deeply appreciated.

Ice_cover2

Money for Twenty (a Parody)

It has always been a dream of mine to be the female Weird Al Yankovich. Parody-writing is a lot of fun. Here is a parody of the song “Money for Nothing” by Dire Straits that summarizes my novel Ice. Enjoy!

Money for Twenty

(I want my, I want my lost money…I want my, I want my lost money…I want my, I want my lost money…I want my, I want my lost money)

Now look at them weirdos

What the hell’re they doing?

They act like they got some kind of ESP

But it ain’t working, that’s the way we’ll do it,

Money for twenty, or we’ll let them freeze.

Now that old building, that is where we’ll do it

Let me tell ya, that cop is dumb

Maybe then we’ll take his daughter with the others

We need to get a hold of the rich one.

(Chorus):

We got to hurry up and get this plan moving

Cuz we got spaces for twenty

We got to get back Manuela’s millions

We got to get back to Miami…

Old Man Watson is the mayor of this hellhole

Yeah, buddy, he’s been hiding here

Old Man Watson thought he was gonna outsmart us

Old Watson’s daughter, she’s a billionaire.

(Chorus)

Get ’em in there! Now!

(Chorus)

Look at that, look there…

She should’ve known to stop all that yellin’

She should’ve known to shut her mouth

Now look at that blood spot that happened when we crushed her skull in, yeah

Against the pool side

Now what’s in here? What’s that? Why are my eyes stinging?

There’s something in the air and now it’s hard to breathe

Ah, this ain’t working. I’m done with this shit, screw it.

Money for twenty, or we let them freeze.

(Chorus)

Listen here, now. This ain’t working. This ain’t how to do it. They took too long and we let them freeze.

This ain’t working. This ain’t how to do it.

Money for twenty or we let them freeze

(Money for twenty, we let them freeze….)

(I want my, I want my, I want my lost money…)

This ain’t working!

Serials and Collections-My New Approach (Part 1)

Those of you who follow my blog and my Facebook group know full-well the frustrations I have experienced while trying to write Glass. Trying to get this plot to go right was like trying to straighten my hair on a humid Georgia day: no matter what special treatments I apply, no matter what “settings” I used,no matter how many times I go over it section by section, it.just.wasn’t.going.to.sit.right. And it was frustrating as hell, because I had characters who, in my mind, were awesome and whose story needed to be told. So, I finally decided to do the same thing to Glass that I do to my hair: cut it so it’s manageable and doesn’t become a huge, tangled mess.

Well, about a week ago when I finally decided that the plot as I had planned it was never going to work (shortly after the rift less than two week ago with a beta-reader and when my husband, upon reading that chapter, told me “I hate to break it to you, Sting (that’s Patrick’s nickname for me), but I have to agree with the beta-reader, at least on that part of it. I can’t understand a single bit of what you’re talking about here.”), I finally decided on a different technique. it was kind of an emergency technique. I was fresh out of ideas, and with summer break coming up, I didn’t want to waste valuable writing time. So I decided that while waiting for Glass to somehow blossom in my mind, I would extract what was originally a minor subplot within Glass, tell the full story behind it, and write it as type of a pre-novel. The concept was easy enough, it was certainly better than doing nothing, and I would still get to use some of the characters I had become so attached to.

Do you all remember those Golden Corral commercials, where the chef with wings smacks the customer with a frying pan and the customer says “Golden Corral!’ (or something like that). That’s what it felt like for me when it occurred to me that since the plot for Glass spanned from 1979 to present day, involved many different subplots (some of which I had to cut out but can now bring back!), and was basically just too much for one narrator to tell, I could write a collection revolving around these two families, the McPhersons and the Hawthornes. This has the added benefit that I can develop the backstories a little more (instead of them being just an afterthought in a bigger novel), develop the characters to my complete satisfaction, and, most importantly, tell the story I want to tell without bogging down one novel. Why didn’t I think of this sooner? The first person who can logically explain this will receive a check for a million dollars from me (postdated to be cashed in the year 33,000).

I began to write the plot outline for this pre-novel (that I’m going to call Earth) and it took me less than a day to map out the plot. I send it to my beta-readers who “approved” it, so now I’m getting started. It’s a crime thriller with a twist of romance. When a young couple is arrested for the murder of the girl’s abusive father, defense attorney Vinny McPherson (the same guy that those of y’all who read the prologue already met) finds himself amazed at the lengths these two will go through for each other. In the process of preparing the defense for the couple, he solves another decades-old crime that took place in his own family. Here are the other books in my planned “McPherson/Hawthorne” series.

2. Fire-As a child, Jeremy (the kid who was called Gerald in the original sequel), watched his mother burn to death in a house fire. Although his mother’s rapist has been identified when his lawyer grandfather was working on another case (and his paternity established), he still has to prove that his mother’s rapist was also her murderer. What Jeremy doesn’t know is that this person was acting on behalf of a much more powerful person-and that Jeremy is still a target. Vinny must reconcile with an old adversary in order to help take down a man who has terrorized both families for years.

3. Water-Vinny becomes the defense attorney for his sister Sandy, a powerful politician, who is accused of murdering her husband by drowning him in the bath tub. During the course of the investigation, it is discovered that Sandy’s late husband may have been involved in some racist assaults. Jeremy, following in his grandfather’s footsteps after taking down one of the world’s most powerful men, takes on his first case by filing a class-action suit on behalf of the assault victims.

4. Wind- When Rev. Charles Greene, one of The Brander’s most famous victims, is shot to death in the parking lot of a fast-food restaurant, the city of Jacksonville breaks out in riots. Jenelle (who will be Gerald/Jeremy’s cousin instead of his daughter, and is the sister and sister-in-law, respectively, of Valerie and Jeff), along with her family, have to fight for survival during the especially nasty riots, which are complicating an evacuation of Jacksonville when deadly Hurricane Alberto approaches. Vinny and Jeremy, now working as partners, defend Jenelle when she is framed for the fatal shooting-and once again find themselves at odds with a powerful person with an axe to grind.

See I was trying to tell ALL THIS in ONE NOVEL! No wonder I couldn’t iron it out! Granted, I had to make some changes to the plot (specifically, Gerald/Jeremy will no longer be a death-row inmate. I’d become too attached to him anyways and really wanted to make him a more powerful character. Secondly, I had to change some of the family relationships. I don’t want to wait twenty years to tell Jenelle’s story. My favorite change: Vinny lives! He is the character I like the most, and I now get to make it so he’s still alive at the end of the series :).

I am also planning a Minterville series, using some of the same characters from Ice. More about that in my next post. Take care!

Author Spotlight-Phillip T. Stephens.

While studying Latin-American and Spanish literature, I became interested in the picaresque genre. Reading works such as Lazarillo de Tormes and Perriquillo Sarniento gave me a taste for the pícaro, a usually wisecracking antihero who recounts his misadventures. While reviewing indie works, I had the pleasure of coming across two authors who have successfully created a modern-day American pícaro. One is Phillip T. Stephens in his novel Cigrets, Guns, and Beer.

Using dry wit and sardonic humor throughout, the novel recounts the story of Dodd Dodd Dodd (no joke-that’s his full legal name), a recent parolee who, having earned his law degree in prison, is headed to Santa Fe for a prospective job. Unfortunately, he finds himself broke down in, of all places, the same town where his ex-cellmate’s brother lives. Sweet Water Falls, Texas is no one-horse town; that would be implying there was a horse and thus, SOMETHING to do besides, as one character bluntly put it, “mattress surf.”  You can literally visualize the tumbleweeds rolling down the road amidst the tiny dust swirls. While waiting for his car to get fixed, Dodd pops into a local store and interrupts an attempted armed robbery by a punk kid. Giving in to a moment of compassion, Dodd takes the kid (who he knows would be fresh meat in the penitentiary) under his wing and tries to help him turn his life around. This is the first of many things that put him at odds with Mal Rafferty and Joe Bob and Ralph Meeker, who hold the titles of mayor, sheriff, justice of the peace, and just about every other official title. Thus begins the adventures of Dodd, whom Sweet Water Fall’s grand oligarchy has reason to believe was involved in a botched robbery many years before (and evidently, some scandal involving a flying saucer) and uses several (sometimes laughable) stall tactics to keep him in town long enough to get to the bottom of the issue.

Rafferty and the Meekers are almost cartoonish in their buffoonery. If you imagine Texas hillbilly versions of the Three Stooges with greedy streaks and incompetent criminal minds, you have these three jokers. They can’t cooperate or get a plan together, even when their life literally depends on it. It’s so easy to confuse them and pit them against each other. Dodd quickly figures this out and uses it to his advantage every chance he gets, and in no time at all, a comedy of errors ensues.

I found Dodd to be an extremely likeable character. He’s calm, cool, and collected, and seems determined to remain on the straight and narrow. Depending on your viewpoint, Cigrets is either misogynist or pro-feminist. In the two weeks we get with Dodd, almost every woman in town comes onto him, and he never turns down the chance for a piece of action. The sex scenes, while highly erotic, are not pornographic.

I would classify Cigrets as a “comedy thriller” (proof that contrasting genres can successfully be blended). Overall, I highly recommend it.

To read: http://www.amazon.com/Cigerets-Guns-Beer-Phillip-Stephens-ebook/dp/B00QLI1Q3K/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1430790783&sr=1-1-fkmr0&keywords=cigrets+beer+and+guns

Author Spotlight-Jeff Mariotte

“Empty Rooms by Jeff Mariotte gripped me from the beginning and wouldn’t let me go. I am a huge fan of crime fiction, and this dark tale of kidnapping, pedophilia, despair, and poverty has made me an offical fan of Mariotte. Richie Krebbs, a recently fired police officer working in an unsatisfying job as a security guard, becomes increasingly fascinated with the abandoned Morton house. Thirteen years ago, a young girl named Angela Morton disappeared without a trace, and Richie finds it suspicious that her parents seemed detached and even unconcerned about their daughter’s disappearance. Richie becomes obsessed with solving the case, and enlists the help of Detective Frank Robey. Together, they embark on a cross-country search of Angela Morton and her parents.
His “good guys” are not perfect, and his “bad guys” are not totally evil. In this way, Mariotte humanizes his characters and the reader feels empathy towards all of them. Richie has a questionable work ethic and comes across as extremely self-absorbed. Likewise, Mariotte delves deep in the mind of a sick pedophile and gives a very objective account of his life-long struggle, and eventual acceptance, of his tendencies. I give Mariotte an A+ for character development.
There were a few plot points that I feel were slightly underdeveloped and even somewhat questionable. The author implies that the pedophile had an incestous relationship with his mother, but there is a part at the end that, if this is true, would disturb readers. (I don’t want to spoil the ending, so I won’t go further than that). And some important characters (such as Sheriff Kate) were cut off at the end. Mariotte had to take a few fictional liberties to make the plot work (an extremely understanding wife who allows him to quit his job although the budget is stretched to the limit to pursue this case, a trusting detective who essentially gives Richie a blank check to finance the pursuit, and a few others) but I think all writers have to do that (myself included). Although I understand that Mariotte was trying to portray the darker side of human nature,  I feel that Mariotte was a little heavy-handed in the theme of domestic violence (basically portraying every man he encounters on the case as a wife-beater and every married woman as afraid to talk to him). The subplot of Wil Fowler and his family is not completely satisfied, so I would love it if Mariotte wrote a follow-up novel that centers around him and his situation.
Mariotte’s use of language is impeccable. He uses a combination of serious narration, manly sarcasm, and local/cultural dialect to tell a vivid tale. His use of wording is anything but cliched. He also expertly uses several symbols and motifs to drive his plot (Superman, angels, the Morton House, and especially the literal and figurative use of “empty rooms”). Mariotte is clearly not afraid to take on some extremely controversial issues, something I highly respect in a writer. I am a new fan and will definitely be reading more of Mariotte’s work.”
To read: http://www.amazon.com/Empty-Rooms-Krebbs-Robey-Casefiles-ebook/dp/B00SLPQLGS/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1425832173&sr=1-1&keywords=Empty+Rooms

Plot Holes?

Have you ever read The Hunger Games? If so, consider this: why would Panem, a nation that seems to purposefully keep its populace living in concentration-camp-like conditions, provide what appears to be a marvelous education (complete with extracurricular activities and music lessons)to its youth? Notice the question word: why?

Within a suspiciously short time, I got nearly identical reviews on Ice that asked why was the pool never drained? Why did the drug lord wait so long to act? Why would a person with no history of violence act out such a complex plan of revenge?

I’m not complaining. I’ll take any reviews I can get. I also respect all readers right to their opinions and I think asking why is healthy. But it did get me thinking: where do we draw the line between plot holes and taking fictional liberties?

Plot holes are a lack of continuity within a story, either in a novel or between series. Here is an example from one of my favorite writers, Mrs. Isabel Allende. In Daughter of Fortune, one of the characters, Pauline del Valle, was pregnant with her fourth child towards the end of the novel. In its sequel, A Portrait in Sepia, thirty years later Pauline only has three children and it specifically states that she had been pregnant three times. What happened to the fourth child? A plot hole can also occur when a writer slacks off and creates a situation that is completely unbelievable; that is, something that cannot be explained at all. Even though they may not be continuity errors, they smack of lazy writing. To use The Hunger Games again, Cato and Clove, who are both consistently portrayed as ruthless killers who never leave a victim breathing, let not one but two victims get away. Cato gives Peeta a leg wound and then walks away, after he is shown to let his temper cloud his judgment.  Clove (who is literally a back-stabbing bitch) wastes a lot of time taunting Katniss, which led to her own demise. Of course, Mrs. Collins wanted to show that Katniss and Peeta had close encounters with the Careers and lived through it, but my thought was that in these two cases, she took the easy way out. One could argue that cato wanted Peeta to suffer a slow death, but this just does not match the characterization that Collins gives him. And another thing: Thresh lets Katniss live because he feels he “owes” her after the compassion she showed Rue. In the arena, there is no “owing.” You either kill or be killed. Now once again, one could argue that for Thresh, it didn’t matter. Whether he let Katniss live or not, he was eventually going to have to go head-to head with Cato. But Katniss’ explanation that “if he won, he would have to face a district that broke its rules to thank me” doesn’t make sense because Thresh had no way of knowing about the bread gift. Once again, I think Collins could have handled this in a more plausible manner.

(Note: my purpose of this post is not to trash Mrs. Collins or The Hunger Games. I loved the book and devoured the entire series in two days. I’m just using it as an example because nowadays, I only read indie authors-due to time constraints-and The Hunger Games is the only mainstream novel I have read lately. I never, under any circumstances, criticize an indie author in this blog). Moving forward:

Fictional Liberties are “boosts” that an author uses to move the plot along. In the cases in Ice I have given above, these boosts were essential to the plot: if the pool had been drained, there would be no plot, at least not as I described it. As to the other two things, I explained those in the book, so either the reader wasn’t paying attention or deliberately ignored them. Once again, I will use The Hunger Games to clarify the difference between a plot hole and a fictional liberty. There are many examples I can give since the novel is chock-full of wild coincidences. The best way to tell them apart is if you have to ask why? As in: why would President Snow, who was apparently completely aware that Katniss routinely violated the law every Sunday by hunting in the woods, be so hesitant to punish her? In fact, Snow missed a great opportunity to hold her up as an example that even victors aren’t immune from the law. Because without Katniss, the story would be over. Period. She is necessary to the plot.  And why exactly is Katniss’ trick wit the berries an act of rebellion, when in 74 years, people have certainly pulled more desperate stunts to survive the arena. And speaking of this: why did Haymitch’s so-called act of rebellion result in the murder of his family but Katniss’ act did not? The answer to that may seem simple-Prim was Snow’s only leverage to force Katniss into prostitution in the Capitol-but why am I getting the impression that Finnick (and possibly Cashmere) were the only victors who actually served as prostitutes. And it says that clients paid Snow for the pleasure of a one-night stand with Finnick, so why would they owe him anything at all, least of all potentially seditious Capitol secrets?

So are you ready for Jessica’s ever-wise recommendations for both readers and writers? (Disclaimer: my opinion only. Not professional advice)

To writers: it is your story and you are free to write it how you choose. Fictional liberties (kept within the bounds of some believability) are fine. In fact, attempting to explain every single little thing will bog down your story. This is why it is called fiction. By definition, fiction is a product of writers’ imagination and not based on fact.

To readers: You are free to rate a work however you see fit; that is absolutely your right. However, if you are overthinking things, you are probably putting more effort into a review than is required for a work of fiction. I would say that if you hated a work, just get it off your chest and say you hated it (although for the life of me, I can’t figure out why a reader would even finish a book that he/she hated so much). I would much rather a reader tell me “I hate this story, I can’t get into it, and I can’t finish it” than to expect me to explain away anything that might deviate from reality a tad or is not written how they would have written it. I mean it. You have the right to tell me you simply hate my story, with no explanation. You are under no obligation to look for a reason to hate it (although I definitely still welcome and appreciate constructive criticism). I have more respect for a reviewer who simply tells me they didn’t like the story than one who tries to impose his or her version of MY story on me.

To answer the question as to why the pool never got drained? Because no one ever thought, “You know, this pool might be used against us one day in an elaborate revenge plan aimed at our beloved mayor. Let’s buy an expensive pump and get this sucker drained right this second.” Anyone who has read Ice knows that the Mints, spoiled into complacency by their peaceful existence, don’t have the same sense of urgency that most normal people have. For this same reason, they don’t bother to prepare for emergencies (like forest fires or errant gunmen).

A very nice review of Ice. Thanks to Ms. Janis Cramlett

http://authorsandangels.blogspot.com/2015/01/review-ice-by-jessica-wren.html

Review

Writing is like fishing. You toss out your line (i.e. your book) hopping to hook a fish(i.e. a reader). They say as well that if you don’t hook your reader within the first few lines then it’s over. That person will probably not continue reading your book. Well luckily Mrs. Wren is a great fisherman for she hooks you within the first few lines with her tantalizing use of words. She writes with a mystery that begs you to read more to find out the meaning behind her setting of words.

Jessica Wren’s book “Ice” takes you on a dramatic, jolting ride. There is a mystery brewing in the small town of Minterville, Georgia. First two mysterious families have moved into the small town of Minterville, which has also brought on an eerie physical gloom of clouds that hang over the town. The clouds just hang there like a cover of gloom giving no rain. Next the Minter stopped. The Minter is this little secret mental communication board some of the towns folks have in Minterville. The big problem with it stopping is that it only stops when there is an evil presence around.

If that is not of enough worry for the residents of Minterville, the women of Minterville start disappearing…

Jessica Wren then takes the floor out from under you as the story takes a shockingly, wicked turn. To remind you this book is title “ICE

 ” there is a reason for that. I enjoyed how the Mrs. Wren weaved the title of her book into the story itself. There is a reason this book is entitled “ICE”. It is not pretty either.

Written in parts, with different narratives by certain towns folks of Minterville was an interesting narrative choice. It worked too. It gave the book a feel of finding an old town newspaper, or town history book. This worked with the overall tone of the story too.

Overall I enjoyed “ICE”. The book was not what I thought it would be. Jessica Wren sets up a nice cozy setting then all of a sudden it takes an enthralling unexpected turn that does not disappoint you.

There were a lot of characters and people being related to this person and that in the book. It kind of confused me a bit, but that is just me. Genealogy confuses me sometime with your brother being your uncles monkey or something like that. In the end good read. This innocently titled book will shock you.

Follow more on Jessica Wren
Homesite: Jessicawrenfiction.com
Twitter:@wrennovels
Facebook: Jessica Wren Fiction

Need a favor.

Please Join my Facebook group Jessica Wren Fiction. https://www.facebook.com/groups/1397640247199145/

It would be most helpful if you would invite your friends. There will be a $10 (minimum) drawing for an Amazon gift card every week starting February 1st, for which all members will be entered. Trying to get this book to take off, and some of the methods that worked in 2013 don’t work today. (simple supply and demand at work).